Wednesday, August 1, 2012

When Was the Last Time You Had a Heapin' Helping of Links?

Robert Boyd


Brian Piana, Medals (After Stella) August 1, 2012, 8:38am CST.

Don't tell the IOC, but Brian Piana is making unauthorized Olympics art. In his patented style, he is using the conversation about the Olympics on Twitter to create these Frank Stella-like concentric squares. He writes:
Medals (After Stella) pulls its composition cues from Twitter, presenting a changing array of concentric squares in gold, silver, and bronze. The piece searches Twitter for recent tweets containing the words “olympics”, “medal”, and at least one of the three medal colors. New qualifying tweets appear in the outer-most ring and are subsequently pushed towards the center.
You can see the latest permutation here, and Piana posts some recent versions here.


 
This was David Shelton's Gallery in San Antonio. (Photo from artist Mimi Kato's website)

San Antonio's Loss is Houston's Gain. Look, running a gallery in Houston is no bed of roses. Bryan Miller Gallery didn't close because Bryan Miller couldn't handle all the success he was having. And yet, we get galleries moving here from other cities. First Art Palace flees Austin for Houston, and now David Shelton is moving his gallery from San Antonio to Houston. As tough as the gallery environment in Houston is, it may be worse in Austin and San Antonio. ["David Shelton Moves to Houston," Rainey Knudson, Glasstire, July 26, 2012]


Roger Langridge, 20 Great Comic Characters and Their Creators



Roger Langridge has excellent taste and staggering mimicry skills. And Tripwire, a magazine that I've never read and that at first glance doesn't really seem like it's aimed at me, has excellent taste for publishing Roger Langridge. That is all. [Hat tip Fantagraphics]


Rockwell Kent, Voyaging (Self-Portrait of the Artist), wood engraving, 1924

Rockwell Kent in Philadelphia. This post from the always-interesting Printeresting makes me wish I had been in Philly last month. The great print-maker/illustrator Rockwell Kent had a big exhibit at the Philadelphia Museum of Art. Kent is less well-known than he should be--his story doesn't fit in with the standard modernist narrative of 20th century American art. But he was one of the greats. ["Rockwell Kent at the PMA," Printeresting, July 30, 2012]


Rockwell Kent, Workers of the World Unite, wood engraving, 1937

 Monitor Man Bartlett's daily expenditures in excruciating detail at Occupy Man. Man Bartlett doesn't do anything short of obsessive. Anyway, here's a very nice video about Man Bartlett. ["VIDEO: Artist Man Bartlett Turns Social Media Into Playful Social Critique," by Kyle Chaka and Tom Chen, Blouin Artinfo, July 25, 2012]



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